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Semester One — Refining and Responding: Literature, Language and Literacy

1. Voices in Our World and Language
Students are provided with the opportunities to study how language is created to influence and persuade readers, listeners, and viewers in different text types, for different contexts, purposes and audiences. These include:
• different forms of media text types in print, non-print and online publications
• application letters and resumes
• different types of speeches in different contexts, for different purposes and audiences
• poetry from different historical periods and cultures
• non-fiction narratives
• documentary and mockumentary
• fiction and non-fiction texts through the wide-reading program, Literature Circles

Study of the nature and functions of language
Integrated within all these units, students will continue to consolidate their reading, language and literacy skills which foster consolidation and knowledge about English language through the processes of listening, speaking, reading, viewing and writing related to their study of the novel, media texts, and the theme. They will continue to consolidate their understanding of persuasive language and read a range of multimodal texts with a focus on understanding the methods of how writers and speakers present a point of view (contention, main and supporting arguments, use of evidence, reasoning).  Students will consolidate their knowledge and understanding of the techniques of persuasion and appeals and be able to identify these in persuasive multimodal texts and explain how they persuade and position the audience.

Summative Assessment 1: Letter of Application for a Job and a Curriculum Vitae
Convince an appropriate employer of their suitability for employment through a convincing letter of application, a resume, and an oral interview role-play.

Summative Assessment 2: Creative Written or Oral Response
Either
• An original creative piece of writing arising from a range of stimuli (approximate length: 800 words).
Or
• Plan, rehearse and deliver an individual or group oral performance (individual speaking time is 6 minutes).
And
• Justify choices made in a written explanation (approximate length: 200–300 words).

2. Voices in Shakespeare
Study of a Shakespearean play and its film adaptation
Students consolidate and further develop their learning and understanding from their Year 9 study of literature, specifically Shakespeare and his ‘world’, by reading and studying Othello.

Students will explore and refine their understandings of how language and imagery is used to create meaning through characterisation, plot, setting, issues and themes, the nature of destiny and fate, literary devices implied views and values (etc.).

A viewing of one film adaptation of Othello for the reinforcement of visual literacy skills and understanding of how texts are adapted and interpreted, will also inform the study of the core text.

Summative Assessment 3: Reading and Viewing
An extended analytical interpretation of the play that fully addresses the question-topic, employing appropriate metalanguage and supported with apt textual evidence. Approximate length: 800 words.

3. Voices in Poetry
Throughout semester 1 and 2, students will read, analyse, interpret and compare a range of poems from different historical and cultural periods. Coursework will focus on how poets create meaning through poetic devices such as language register, imagery and symbolism, structure and form, rhythm and rhyme and how these stylistic features, and the ideas and themes of poems can be compared. The study of comparative poetry will be assessed in the term 3 examination.

Semester Two — Extending and Enriching: Literature, Language and Literacy

4. Voices in Context
Study of a thematic context

Context 1
Context 2
Context 3

Banned Books
What is about certain texts that inspires controversy? What aspects of our humanity are we so frightened of that we would ban a book or film? Can literature ever cross lines that ought not be crossed? This unit will look at works of literature that have been banned at certain times and in certain countries and explore what it is about these novels that makes them inspire such strong, and often negative, responses.

Suggested Film Text:
Fa
hrenheit 451

Gurus and Charlatans
How do you tell a wise guru from someone who is just pretending to be one? Using works of fiction as a basis, the unit will explore the difference between true wisdom and foolishness, luck and fate, trust and gullibility, genius and madness.

Suggested Film Text:
Being There

Hearts of Darkness
What is evil? The unit has a strong emphasis on investigating and discussing the philosophical, social and ethical issues of humanity’s capacity for evil, and on making judgements about people’s behaviours and actions.

Suggested Film Text:
Lord of the Flies
A Simple Plan
Context 4
Context 5
 

This Sporting Life
What can sport tell us about the tricky business of being human? The unit will examine sport as a metaphor for life, and the way sport has been represented throughout time in writing.

Suggested Film Text:
The Natural
Field of Dreams

Our Fragile Environment
What is the relationship between human life and the environment that we are part of? This unit will examine some of the features of environmental literature, the environment in relation to historical processes such as colonisation and industrialisation, and in light of the climate change crisis. Students will be encouraged to rethink conventional distinctions between 'nature' and 'culture', 'human' and 'animal', and consider how the environment is part of human history, society and politics.

Suggested Film Text:
Interstellar Princess
Mononoke 

 

During terms 3 and 4, students’ reading, viewing, writing, language and literacy skills are informed by their study of one Context (from a choice of four). They are required to engage in a close study of one film, to read widely – print, non-print and multimodal texts, and participate in the reading program Literature Circles in order to explore, develop and extend the ideas and arguments associated with the selected Context.

The Context provides students with the opportunity to consolidate their knowledge and understanding of how language is created to influence and persuade readers, listeners, and viewers in different text types, for different contexts, purposes and audiences. These include:

  • close study of one film
  • close study of two or more fiction and non-fiction texts from different historical periods and cultures through the wide-reading program, Literature Circles
  • different forms of media text types in print, non-print and online publications
  • different types of speeches in different contexts, for different purposes and audiences
  • poetry from different historical periods and cultures
  • film narratives
  • short non-fiction narratives from different historical periods and cultures
  • documentaries

The theme study also includes issues-related tasks arising from the media with a focus on how writers use ideas and language to present reasoned opinions and arguments.

Study of the nature and functions of language
Integrated within the Context / Theme Study, students will continue to consolidate their reading, language and literacy skills which foster consolidation and knowledge about English language through the processes of listening, speaking, reading, viewing and writing related to their study of the novel, media texts, and the theme. They will continue to consolidate their understanding of persuasive language and read a range of multimodal texts with a focus on understanding the methods of how writers and speakers present a point of view (contention, main and supporting arguments, use of evidence, reasoning).  Students will consolidate their knowledge and understanding of the techniques of persuasion and appeals and be able to identify these in persuasive multimodal texts and explain how they persuade and position the audience.

Summative Assessment Task 4:Oral Persuasive Argument
Plan, rehearse and present a reasoned and convincing persuasive argument in small groups in an appropriate form (e.g. 7:30 Report, Q&A, a formal debate), demonstrating skilful use of appropriate oral language conventions to engage and persuade an audience. The issue may or may not relate specifically to the Context.

Summative Assessment Task 5: Expositroy or Imaginative Writing
A sustained expository or imaginative text created in a suitable form and for an authentic publication that explores, compares and contrasts the ’big’ ideas of the Context and presented in the set film and supplementary texts. (approximate length: 800 – 1000 words).
• A reflective written explanation is to accompany the piece of writing (approximate length: 200–300 words).

Examination

Summative Assessment Task: Comparative Poetry Essay
The exam will test each student’s skill acqisition in reading and writing in the form of a sustained analytical comparative interpretation about the ideas and themes and how poets create meaning through poetic devices in two or more unseen cross-cultural poems.

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Last up-dated 8 November 2019
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